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Sun Safety: Let’s Talk About Rays

14 Aug

Sunscreen.

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We think we’re protecting ourselves when we slather up with SPF 30+, but did you know that most sunscreens only protect against UVB rays and leave us open to damage caused by UVA rays?

Wait, what? Let’s backtrack. Before we talk about what we need to be protected from, let’s define the different types of rays.

 

The sun is the earth’s source of light and energy. In order to provide us with the things we need to survive, the sun lets off UV radiation as a part of the light spectrum that shines down on earth. These UV rays are classified by length in three categories: UVA, UVB, and UVC.

 

UVA:

The longest of the waves, these are divided further into two categories (UVAI and UVAII). These waves account for 95% of the UV rays that reach the earth’s surface, and thus we are exposed to these rays often. UVA rays penetrate the skin more deeply than UVB rays, and contribute to pre-mature aging and wrinkling. It was not suspected until recently that UVA rays were harmful beyond the aesthetic, but it is now understood that UVA rays damage the middle (basal & squamous) layer of the skin and may even initiate skin cancer.

UVB:

These are the medium sized rays. They mostly reach the outer layers of our skin, and are the primary cause for sunburn and sunspots. All sunscreens provide UVB protection, most pretty adequately. Its intensity, unlike the constant UVA rays, changes depending on season and location.

UVC:

These rays are the shortest. So short, in fact, that most of them don’t even penetrate the earth’s atmosphere. As of now, no studies have pointed to UVB rays as a problem for our skin.

 

Because UVB rays and not UVA rays cause the visible damage to our skin, it was long thought that UVA rays were not harmful to us. In light of recent discoveries, UVA rays may be even MORE harmful for us than UVB rays and most sunscreens don’t protect against them! So read carefully, my friends, and when you go out to buy sunscreen make sure you’re getting one with UVAI, UVAII, and UVB protection to keep your skin safe and youthful for years to come!

Turmeric? Tumeric? Turmer-what?

22 Jun

Turmeric. 

We’ve been hearing about this super food for months, but what is it? A powder? A root? A magical health elixir? 

Thankfully, the JUARA Turmeric Benefits Guide is here to answer all of your questions!

So, let’s start with the basics. What is turmeric?

Part of the ginger family, turmeric is a native plant to southeast India. Turmeric is most popularly used in two forms: raw and dried. Turmeric has been used for almost 1000 years in cuisine, medicine, makeup, skin care, and clothes dying. 

What are the health benefits of turmeric?

When ingested, turmeric has historically been used to heal stomach and liver ailments. Turmeric powder concoctions have been used to bring down fevers. It can also be used as an anti-bacterial salve on open wounds. Those who consume turmeric on a regular basis report a reduction in arthritis pain, heartburn, sensitive stomachs, headaches, colds, and menstrual cramps. It may also help those with diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, and certain types of cancer.

What can turmeric do for my skin?

Turmeric, with its anti-inflammatory and redness reducing properties, can be used to treat a variety of skin conditions including eczema, allergic hives, and even chicken pox! Turmeric is also a great treatment for acne, as it is both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. The JUARA Turmeric Face Mask maximizes the healing properties of turmeric by combining it with kaolin clay! 

Are there any side effects of ingesting or topically applying turmeric?

There are no known side effects for applying turmeric directly onto the skin. When ingesting turmeric, however, it is important to remember that turmeric is a blood thinner. Consuming turmeric daily makes it more difficult for your blood to clot, so lessen your turmeric intake if you take medicine that thins your blood. 

 

Do you still have questions about Turmeric and its uses? Leave a comment on our Facebook page!

High Blood Pressure Is Affecting… Your skin???

22 May

High Blood Pressure Affects 1 in 3 Adults in the United States.

But what does that really mean? And how is it affecting your skin??

Blood pressure measures the rate at which the heart pumps blood and the effect that force has on the walls of the arteries. High Blood Pressure is extremely common and, as it has very few visible symptoms, can go untreated for years in seemingly healthy adults.

Dissecting The Numbers

So when you go to the doctor and they tell you your blood pressure is #/#, what does that really mean? Well, the top number (systolic blood pressure) measures the BP when the heart is beating and the bottom number (diastolic blood pressure) measures the BP in when the heart is resting in between beats. So what’s healthy? How do the numbers break down?

These are the current numbers according to The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute:

Blood Pressure     Top Number     And/Or     Bottom Number
Normal                          >120               AND                      >80
Prehypertension        120-139            OR                      80-89
High BP 1                     140-159            OR                      90-99
High BP 2                      160+                OR                      100+

So now that we’ve got the numbers down, what does this mean for your skin?

As your blood pressure rises over time, blood vessels throughout the body become damaged. The damage done to these vessels, especially the smaller ones at the surface of the skin and on the face, can cause a rash to form on the body. Damage to blood vessels near the face can also lead to decreased oxygen levels being delivered to the skin, which can result in the following symptoms:

  • loss of skin elasticity
  • dull skin
  • red skin
  • ashy skin
  • slowing of collagen/elastin production

So what can you do to stop this from happening?

  • Yearly doctor visits to check your blood pressure

Catching rising blood pressure before it gets out of hand is key!

  • Add less salt to your foods
  • Exercise Daily-

Even a 10 minute walk can make a difference!

  • Manage your weight

High BP is often correlated with obesity

  • Try a Mediterranean diet

High in fruits, veggies, and protein. Low in red meat and carbohydrates.

  • Listen to your body!

Feeling sluggish or weak? Don’t ignore it- get checked out!

 

 

Skin Cancer Prevention

15 May

May is Skin Cancer Prevention/Awareness Month

Skin cancer is a rapidly growing problem in the United States with over 3.5 million new cases diagnosed every year, and in honor of skin cancer awareness month here are some tips to help you stay skin-healthy during the upcoming summer months!

1. Wear Sunscreen Everyday

Most of us use sunscreen at the beach, but did you know that for true protection you have to wear sunscreen everyday? Think about it- our faces and hands are exposed to the sun even when our bodies are covered by clothes. Use a protective sunscreen on your face and hands (at least SPF 20) every day to maintain healthy skin and prevent sun spots and precancerous growths. And remember- the sun’s rays are still strong even when it’s cloudy, so don’t skip sunscreen on rainy days!

2. Try a Hat!

Sun hats aren’t just for the beach. Wear one while walking outside, gardening, shopping, or running errands to protect the skin on the top of your head and your face from extra sun exposure. Plus, a sun hat is a cute addition to any outfit!

3. Stay Out Of The Booth

Sun tanned skin is beautiful, but not at the cost of your health. Even one trip to the tanning booth/bed can increase your chances of getting melanoma (the deadliest form of skin cancer) by a whopping 75%

If you’re really dying for that tanned glow, try a spray tan or at home tanning lotion. For a less permanent fix, mix a touch of bronzer to your daily body cream.

4. Know Your Skin

Did you know that dermatologists recommend that you perform an at-home skin examination once a month? Knowing your body is key to detecting any illness early, and keeping track of your moles, birthmarks, skin tags, and sun spots is no exception! And just like an internal check up, it’s important to have a dermatologist perform an external check up once a year to catch anything you may have missed.

5. Protect Yourself While Driving

We feel safe from the sun’s reach inside our cars, but we’re really not! While your windshield has built in UV protection, the side windows do not and generally let in about 63% of the sun’s rays! There is a solution: Window Film. Window film is endorsed by the Skin Cancer Foundation and blocks out almost 100% of the sun’s rays. Remember- even window film can only protect you when windows are closed, so if you like to cruise with the top/windows down apply sunscreen to your face, neck, and arms before getting into the car.

Rosacea- Debunking The Myths

10 Apr

You may notice one day

that your post-exercise flush on the cheeks won’t go away. Or perhaps you notice little red bumps that look like acne pimples. If you are in your 30s or older and have fair skin, you may have rosacea.

Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder that affects approximately 1 out of 20 Americans, usually between the ages of 30 and 60.

Symptoms:

  • Mostly affects the face or eyes
  • Persistent flushing
  • Visible blood vessels
  • Ruddiness
  • Pimples
  • Irritated eyes that, if untreated, become worse over time.

Currently, there is no cure for rosacea, but with proper treatment and awareness of triggers, symptoms can be controlled and the disease kept in check.Once you are properly diagnosed, your physician may prescribe a topical or oral treatment to address the redness, bumps and skin inflammation associated with rosacea.

Many dermatologiss also recommend laser and intense pulse light treatments to reduce redness and broken blood vessels. These new therapy options are considered safe and can visibly improve skin tone and texture.

 

There are also things you can do on a daily basis to help control the symptoms of rosacea.

1. Be aware of factors that trigger your flare-ups. Triggers include sudden temperature changes, hot baths, exercise, alcohol consumption, spicy food, sun exposure, stress and harsh cosmetics.

2. Choose gentle skincare products that do not contain alcohol, harsh detergents or abrasive ingredients.

  • Products with calming ingredients such as JUARA Tamarind Tea Hydrating Toner and JUARA Clove and Turmeric Serum help soothe skin and keep it hydrated.
    • Rice Bran Extract, a key ingredient in the toner, provides calming benefits and minimizes redness in the skin.
    • Green Tea, Black Tea, and White Tea, when combined, calm the skin and deliver a bundle of healthy antioxidants.
    • Turmeric, a super-ingredient, brightens and evens out complexion while providing free radical protection.
  • Concealers with a green tint  neutralize redness in the skin and can be worn underneath regular foundation.
  • Since sun exposure is considered a trigger factor, daily sun protection is key. Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher, such as Suntegrity Natural Moisturizing Face Sunscreen, and wear a hat and protective clothing outdoors.