Tag Archives: skin health

Turmeric? Tumeric? Turmer-what?

22 Jun

Turmeric. 

We’ve been hearing about this super food for months, but what is it? A powder? A root? A magical health elixir? 

Thankfully, the JUARA Turmeric Benefits Guide is here to answer all of your questions!

So, let’s start with the basics. What is turmeric?

Part of the ginger family, turmeric is a native plant to southeast India. Turmeric is most popularly used in two forms: raw and dried. Turmeric has been used for almost 1000 years in cuisine, medicine, makeup, skin care, and clothes dying. 

What are the health benefits of turmeric?

When ingested, turmeric has historically been used to heal stomach and liver ailments. Turmeric powder concoctions have been used to bring down fevers. It can also be used as an anti-bacterial salve on open wounds. Those who consume turmeric on a regular basis report a reduction in arthritis pain, heartburn, sensitive stomachs, headaches, colds, and menstrual cramps. It may also help those with diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, and certain types of cancer.

What can turmeric do for my skin?

Turmeric, with its anti-inflammatory and redness reducing properties, can be used to treat a variety of skin conditions including eczema, allergic hives, and even chicken pox! Turmeric is also a great treatment for acne, as it is both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory. The JUARA Turmeric Face Mask maximizes the healing properties of turmeric by combining it with kaolin clay! 

Are there any side effects of ingesting or topically applying turmeric?

There are no known side effects for applying turmeric directly onto the skin. When ingesting turmeric, however, it is important to remember that turmeric is a blood thinner. Consuming turmeric daily makes it more difficult for your blood to clot, so lessen your turmeric intake if you take medicine that thins your blood. 

 

Do you still have questions about Turmeric and its uses? Leave a comment on our Facebook page!

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Your Skin Care Spring Clean!

24 May

May is a month of fresh starts, new beginnings, and of course Spring Cleaning!

But I’m not talking about spring cleaning for your house… I’m talking about spring cleaning for your face.

Makeup is NOT meant to last forever!

Do you still have that purple eyeliner you bought 4 years ago as a joke and sometimes wear when you go out with your girls?

It’s time to LOSE IT! So to help you get the most out of your makeup ‘spring clean’, here it is:

The Ultimate Guide To Makeup Shelf Life:

Mascara: 3 Months

Mascara has the shortest shelf-life because it has the highest risk of transferring bacteria into the delicate eye-area. And whatever you do, don’t add water to drying-out mascara!

Dry Eye Shadow: 2 Years
Liquid Eye Shadow: 10-12 Months
Eyeliner Pencil: 6-18 Months

This one really depends on how you use it. An eyeliner pencil that is sharpened before each use and is only used to line the outside of the eye should last you a good 18 months. If you’re not as vigilant and tend to line the inside of your eyes, you should probably toss it after 6 months.

Blush: 1-2 Years
Cream Blush: 1 Year
Lipstick: 2 Years

But make sure you disinfect your lipsticks if you use them while you’re sick!

Liquid Foundation & Concealer: 12-18 Months

With foundations and concealers, it’s not the makeup that holds germs- it’s the brush. If you use a disposable applicator, great! If not, make sure to disinfect your brushes at least once every 2 weeks for optimal cleanliness.

 

Rosacea- Debunking The Myths

10 Apr

You may notice one day

that your post-exercise flush on the cheeks won’t go away. Or perhaps you notice little red bumps that look like acne pimples. If you are in your 30s or older and have fair skin, you may have rosacea.

Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder that affects approximately 1 out of 20 Americans, usually between the ages of 30 and 60.

Symptoms:

  • Mostly affects the face or eyes
  • Persistent flushing
  • Visible blood vessels
  • Ruddiness
  • Pimples
  • Irritated eyes that, if untreated, become worse over time.

Currently, there is no cure for rosacea, but with proper treatment and awareness of triggers, symptoms can be controlled and the disease kept in check.Once you are properly diagnosed, your physician may prescribe a topical or oral treatment to address the redness, bumps and skin inflammation associated with rosacea.

Many dermatologiss also recommend laser and intense pulse light treatments to reduce redness and broken blood vessels. These new therapy options are considered safe and can visibly improve skin tone and texture.

 

There are also things you can do on a daily basis to help control the symptoms of rosacea.

1. Be aware of factors that trigger your flare-ups. Triggers include sudden temperature changes, hot baths, exercise, alcohol consumption, spicy food, sun exposure, stress and harsh cosmetics.

2. Choose gentle skincare products that do not contain alcohol, harsh detergents or abrasive ingredients.

  • Products with calming ingredients such as JUARA Tamarind Tea Hydrating Toner and JUARA Clove and Turmeric Serum help soothe skin and keep it hydrated.
    • Rice Bran Extract, a key ingredient in the toner, provides calming benefits and minimizes redness in the skin.
    • Green Tea, Black Tea, and White Tea, when combined, calm the skin and deliver a bundle of healthy antioxidants.
    • Turmeric, a super-ingredient, brightens and evens out complexion while providing free radical protection.
  • Concealers with a green tint  neutralize redness in the skin and can be worn underneath regular foundation.
  • Since sun exposure is considered a trigger factor, daily sun protection is key. Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher, such as Suntegrity Natural Moisturizing Face Sunscreen, and wear a hat and protective clothing outdoors.